Acupuncture
Acupuncture is one of the oldest, most commonly used systems of healing in the world. Originating in China some 3,500 years ago, only in the last three decades has it become popular in the United States.
Traditional Chinese medicine asserts that there are as many as 2,000 acupuncture points on the human body, which are connected by 20 pathways (12 main, 8 secondary) called meridians. These meridians conduct energy, or qi (pronounced "chee"), between the surface of the body and its internal organs. Each point has a different effect on the qi that passes through it. Qi is believed to help regulate balance in the body. It is influenced by the opposing forces of yin and yang, which represent
positive and negative energy and forces in the universe and human body. Acupuncture is believed to keep the balance between yin and yang, thus allowing for the normal flow of qi throughout the body and restoring health to the mind and body.

~~~

Several theories have been presented as to exactly how acupuncture works. One theory suggests that pain impulses are blocked from reaching the spinal cord or brain at various "gates" to these areas. Since a majority of acupuncture points are either connected to (or are located near) neural structures, this suggests that acupuncture stimulates the nervous system. Another theory suggests that acupuncture stimulates the body to produce narcotic-like substances called endorphins, which reduce pain. Other studies have found that other pain-relieving substances called opiods may be released into the body during acupuncture treatment.

Unlike hypodermic needles, acupuncture needles are solid and hair-thin, and they are not designed to cut the skin. They are also inserted to much more shallow levels than hypodermic needles, generally no more than a half-inch to an inch depending on the type of treatment being delivered. While each person experiences acupuncture differently, most people feel only a minimal amount of pain as the needles are inserted. Some people reportedly feel a sensation of excitement, while others feel relaxed. If you experience significant pain from the needles, it may be a sign that the procedure is being done improperly.

Conditions Commonly Treated With Acupuncture
~Neck or Cervical Pain
~Shoulder Pain
~Lower Back Pain
~Sciatica
~Hip Pain
~Anxiety
~Depression
~Headaches & Migranes
~Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
~Sinus Problems
~Arthritis & Arthritic Pain
~Irritable Bowel Syndrome
~Sports Injuries
~Motor Vehicle Injuries
~Stress Related Disorders
~Menstrual & PMS Problems
~Smoking Addiction
~Obesity & Weight Control
~Infertility

Other Treatments Offered

Reflexology:
Reflexology is the practice of applying pressure to the feet and hands utilizing specific thumb, finger and hand techniques without the use of oil, cream or lotion based on a system of zones and reflex areas that reflect an image of the body on the feet and hands with a premise that such work effects a physical change in the body.

Acupressure:
Acupressure is an ancient healing art that uses the fingers to press key points on the surface of the skin to stimulate the body's natural self-curative abilities.

Cupping:
Cupping is an ancient Chinese method of causing local congestion. A partial vacuum is created in cups placed on the skin either by means of heat or suction. This draws up the underlying tissues. When the cup is left in place on the skin for a few minutes, blood stasis is formed and localized healing takes place.

Jin Shin Do:
Jin Shin Do means simply the Way of the Compassionate Spirit, and is a non-judgmental modality that takes positive elements of many different forms of energy and body work to create a powerful healing technique. Jin Shin Do focuses on set pressure points, and different techniques to relieve stress at those points. It draws these points from both Chinese and Japanese acupressure.

Moxibustion:
Moxibustion is a traditional Chinese medicine technique that involves the burning of mugwort, a small, spongy herb, to facilitate healing. Moxibustion has been used throughout Asia for thousands of years; in fact, the actual Chinese character for acupuncture, translated literally, means "acupuncture-moxibustion." The purpose of moxibustion, as with most forms of traditional Chinese medicine, is to strengthen the blood, stimulate the flow of qi, and maintain general health.

Gua Sha:
Gua Sha is used whenever a patient has pain whether associated with an acute or chronic disorder.  There may be aching, tenderness and/or a knotty feeling in the muscles. Palpation reveals Sha when normal finger pressure on a patient's skin causes blanching that is slow to fade. In addition to resolving musculo skeletal pain, Gua Sha is used to treat as well as prevent common cold, flu, bronchitis, asthma, as well as any chronic disorder involving pain, congestion of Qi and blood.


Tui Na:
Tui Na is a sophisticated medical massage used to treat injuries, joint and muscle problems and internal disorders. Tui Na techniques and manipulations are rigorous. It involves applying finger pressure, hands, elbows and knees as a tool to directly influence the flow of Qi (body energy) to treat disease and illnesses. Tui Na is also used to protect health by building immunity, so that disease can be stopped in its beginning acting as a preventative medical care. It involves a deep tissue massage to various acupuncture points without the use of needles. In many cases it is used for children, seniors and for individuals who may be afraid of needles.